For Sellers
Do Your Homework

Home sellers can drastically increase their offers if they first make an effort to understand the market. Do homeowners expect luxury staging during a home showing? What is the average list price vs. the average sale price? Is it a buyer’s or a seller’s market? While every buyer will be slightly different in terms of their priorities, there will be specific trends that tie home sales together. No matter what interest rates or demand are like though, sellers still hold a lot of control when it comes to the quality of their offers. Setting a price that’s high enough to attract serious buyers but low enough to spark a bidding war is easier once sellers grasp the driving forces behind the final numbers. A good Realtor can help you learn more about these trends, but sellers are also encouraged to do their own research as well. In addition, sellers should also start to gather their paperwork as early as possible (e.g., the home deed, relevant permits, property tax history, etc.) This can help to expedite the sales transaction immensely when the time comes.

Examine Your Finances

Understanding how your finances will be impacted will make it easier to make decisions during the sale. For example, do you have the leeway to wait for the right buyer or do you need to sell in order to pay off other obligations immediately? Once you have a better idea of where you are and where you want to go, a financial professional or a Realtor can make it easier to determine how to use your assets to increase your total cumulative wealth. Having an appraisal done is usually the first way for a seller to get an accurate idea of how much their home will sell for. It’s not as easy as just going to a website and inputting your address, or using the average of other home sales in the area. Once someone comes out to see the home, they’ll be able to say just how much the old wiring or broken walkway will affect the total price of the home. From there, you can figure out how to price the home so as to spark buyer interest without setting yourself up for lowball offers.

Show Your Home Some Love

Sellers may not have to buy cashmere blankets to drape over luxury chairs that are perfectly staged near the fireplace, but they may have to fix the cabinets or put a fresh coat of paint on the front door. Most buyers make up their minds immediately upon seeing the outside of the home, so first impressions really can make a difference when it comes to just how much a seller gets. And this goes for all home sales — not just multi-million dollar mansions. Buyers want to see that the home was loved and taken care of by the previous owners. If there are too many visible flaws, sellers may only attract home flippers who won’t want to pay anything close to the listed price. You’ll also want to be as transparent as possible during this time by disclosing everything that you know about the home — including telling the buyer about any unpermitted work or safety issues you know about. A home seller can even preemptively pay for their own home inspection as a way of showing they have nothing to hide.

Understand the Process

There will be multiple parties looking into your finances and ownership claims before you can finalize the closing paperwork, so sellers should know exactly what’s in store for them once they have their official offers on the table. A title company will attempt to unearth any potential problems that may arise after the buyer takes control of the home, such as a neighbor or ex-spouse contesting the property lines or ownership of the home. Similarly, any outstanding liens or financial contracts will be discovered and then reported to the buyer as well. If the house has any secrets whatsoever, it’s the perfect excuse for a home sale to fall through. Sellers will also need to pay attention to everything they’re agreeing to. The bill of sale should explicitly state everything that is being transferred over to the buyer — including fixtures and appliances. So if the seller leaves behind their satellite dish by accident, they’ll have a way to get it back from the buyer. If there are any discrepancies between the initial and the closing paperwork, then it can significantly lengthen the escrow period.

Home sellers can drastically increase their offers if they first make an effort to understand the market. Do homeowners expect luxury staging during a home showing? What is the average list price vs. the average sale price? Is it a buyer’s or a seller’s market? While every buyer will be slightly different in terms of their priorities, there will be specific trends that tie home sales together. No matter what interest rates or demand are like though, sellers still hold a lot of control when it comes to the quality of their offers. Setting a price that’s high enough to attract serious buyers but low enough to spark a bidding war is easier once sellers grasp the driving forces behind the final numbers. A good Realtor can help you learn more about these trends, but sellers are also encouraged to do their own research as well. In addition, sellers should also start to gather their paperwork as early as possible (e.g., the home deed, relevant permits, property tax history, etc.) This can help to expedite the sales transaction immensely when the time comes.

Understanding how your finances will be impacted will make it easier to make decisions during the sale. For example, do you have the leeway to wait for the right buyer or do you need to sell in order to pay off other obligations immediately? Once you have a better idea of where you are and where you want to go, a financial professional or a Realtor can make it easier to determine how to use your assets to increase your total cumulative wealth. Having an appraisal done is usually the first way for a seller to get an accurate idea of how much their home will sell for. It’s not as easy as just going to a website and inputting your address, or using the average of other home sales in the area. Once someone comes out to see the home, they’ll be able to say just how much the old wiring or broken walkway will affect the total price of the home. From there, you can figure out how to price the home so as to spark buyer interest without setting yourself up for lowball offers.

Sellers may not have to buy cashmere blankets to drape over luxury chairs that are perfectly staged near the fireplace, but they may have to fix the cabinets or put a fresh coat of paint on the front door. Most buyers make up their minds immediately upon seeing the outside of the home, so first impressions really can make a difference when it comes to just how much a seller gets. And this goes for all home sales — not just multi-million dollar mansions. Buyers want to see that the home was loved and taken care of by the previous owners. If there are too many visible flaws, sellers may only attract home flippers who won’t want to pay anything close to the listed price. You’ll also want to be as transparent as possible during this time by disclosing everything that you know about the home — including telling the buyer about any unpermitted work or safety issues you know about. A home seller can even preemptively pay for their own home inspection as a way of showing they have nothing to hide.

There will be multiple parties looking into your finances and ownership claims before you can finalize the closing paperwork, so sellers should know exactly what’s in store for them once they have their official offers on the table. A title company will attempt to unearth any potential problems that may arise after the buyer takes control of the home, such as a neighbor or ex-spouse contesting the property lines or ownership of the home. Similarly, any outstanding liens or financial contracts will be discovered and then reported to the buyer as well. If the house has any secrets whatsoever, it’s the perfect excuse for a home sale to fall through. Sellers will also need to pay attention to everything they’re agreeing to. The bill of sale should explicitly state everything that is being transferred over to the buyer — including fixtures and appliances. So if the seller leaves behind their satellite dish by accident, they’ll have a way to get it back from the buyer. If there are any discrepancies between the initial and the closing paperwork, then it can significantly lengthen the escrow period.

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